Sunday, April 30, 2017

Remain In Fellowship – Remain Ready

In this service at Westchester Chapel I open the service and introduce the short films A Matter of Perspective and One Day. I also mention Twin Rocks Friends Camp and the Joni and Friends performance that put me in touch with the filmmakers of A Matter of Perspective.

Rachel Taylor teaches on Matthew 24:36-44 and Genesis 6. Dr. Linda Warren prays over the message and over Joyce and my trip to Orlando for the International Christian Film Festival where both films are up for Best Short Film, Best Director and Best Lead Actor. One Day is also nominated for Best Screenplay. Dr. Linda also shares announcements.

Click the arrow below, or if you're reading this in an email you can click this link, to play the service:



This service is available for download free on iTunes, where you can also subscribe to our podcast. Search for "Westchester Chapel" on the iTunes Store.

If you want to more about starting a relationship with Jesus Christ visit www.WestchesterChapel.org/Salvation.

Photo courtesy of NicolettiPhoto.com.

I play a lead in Providence, which you can bring to your area.

Tuesday, April 25, 2017

Pure Flix Is Getting Attention

The New York Times just did a front page of the SundayStyles section article on Pure Flix: Seeing, and Streaming, Is Believing. Though the title of the article is having fun with the subject, the article is quite fair-minded. 

If I missed one please post it in a comment below. Thanks!

I play a lead in Providence, though it's not yet on PureFlix.com you can bring to your area.

Monday, April 24, 2017

The High School Final

Joyce and I with Cindy on a recent
visit she took to NYC.
Since about 1994 I've been performing in public schools through the invitation of Cindy Sebring.

That year I drove (back when I tried to keep a car in NYC) down to the DC area for a Christians in Theatre Arts conference. I remember the rain was also driving, and my windshield wipers weren't staying up with the volume. I ended up getting there in the middle of a performance by Frank Runyon, the third one-man play I'd seen, after Curt Cloninger and Roger Nelson. A gentleman in the back of the auditorium welcomed me, and after the performance we struck up a conversation. He knew some folks at the Lamb's Church of the Nazarene where I was an intern at the time. He asked me where I was staying, and I told him I hadn't figured that out yet. I didn't tell him, but I was hoping someone would give me a place to stay so I wouldn't have to spend a significant percentage of my savings on a hotel! He invited me to stay with his family, and to join them on Sunday at their church. 

That Sunday I met Cindy. Soon I was invited to perform at a retreat that church was hosting. Cindy offered to drive me to the retreat from DC. 

Soon after the retreat started Friday evening I told the pastor who would be preaching Sunday morning that I'd be happy to write a fresh piece to go with his sermon, but he didn't know what passage he'd be using. At about 10pm Saturday night he said he'd be preaching on John:15:1-17, about the Vine and the Branches. I stayed up until about 3am writing (and rehearsing) The Legend of Billy Branch, which came with some musical interludes. I discovered the next morning that Cindy's room was next to mine and she heard me singing as I rehearsed the piece! 

I'm pretty sure it was on that trip, despite her loss of sleep, that Cindy invited me to perform and teach workshops at her public high school for the first time. In those 23 years she only invited me if her classes were well-behaved, but there weren't many years I missed. 

I just returned from my final performance for her students. She is retiring in a couple of months. It was a very special trip, because these opportunities have been priceless.

This time around I performed The Fall, my one-act piece based on the novel Les Misérables. I shared it with three classes, and after each I followed up with a sociodrama. The first one was short, so I just based it on Les Miz. I engaged them in an exercise which allowed them to express the most valuable thing to them. The winning vote was, interestingly enough, food. My one-act revolves around the bishop forgiving Jean Valjean for stealing his silver, after which the bishop gives him his silver candlesticks. In our scenario the bishop character was a homeless man. Jean Valjean stole his pizza. A police officer brought him back, but Jean Valjean said, "If he stole from a homeless man he must really need the pizza more than I do," at which point he gave him a $5. All of this came from the students. 

The other two classes had just read Fahrenheit 451, a novel about censorship. The title is the temperature at which paper burns. The main character is a fireman, meaning he sets fire to books. I told them some of the discoveries we've made visiting Cuba, ChinaRussia, and two borders of North Korea

The first of those two classes did a sociodrama based on a student who was told by his parents that if he didn't cut his hair he would not be allowed to cut his hair until after he graduated from high school in a couple of years. Afterward I drew from another story they'd read: Death of a Salesman. I pointed out that Willy Loman drew his identity in part from his son, Biff. Tim Keller uses this as an illustration in a sermon on the Breastplate of Righteousness. Then I pointed out that parents who, regardless of motives, have the right to raise their children in the ways they think best, but dictators controlling what their people are able to read and say is a very different thing. 

The last class also brought up a parental scenario, but I brought up the difference between parents and dictators right up front. The students ended up exploring a world in which it was no longer legal for us to speak to people outside of our nation. The main character was on the phone with a friend in Russia. The police knocked on her door and told her they discovered that she was on an international call. She hid her phone, but the police did a sweep of her home and discovered a computer, which the enactors decided in the moment was also illegal. She complained that she had purchased the computer when it was legal to have one. One of the officers told her she should have thrown it out the window when the law was passed. (I pointed out that this was an SAT word posted in the halls of their school: "defenestrate.") In the end the young woman was able to escape with her hidden phone. I asked them if Fahrenheit 451 felt more real after living through a similar scenario. There was an overwhelming agreement that the sociodrama had helped make it more real. 

I hope there will be other opportunities to share my plays and workshops in public schools, so if you know of a teacher who might be open send him or her to www.RichDrama.com


A Clear Leading, one of the plays I've shared at Cindy's school, tells the story of Quaker abolitionist John Woolman, who spoke against slavery a century before our Civil War.

Sunday, April 16, 2017

Easter Fellowship: Turn to the One Who Knows Your Name

Joyce teaches on John 20:1-18, and she shares one of her funniest stories from her corporate career! Pastor Jim Warren opens the service with "Happy Resurrection Day" in the numerous languages of our congregation, and Pastor Linda Warren prays over the children and the sermon.

Click the arrow below, or if you're reading this in an email you can click this link, to play the service:



This service is available for download free on iTunes, where you can also subscribe to our podcast. Search for "Westchester Chapel" on the iTunes Store.

We opened with Don Francisco's "He's Alive!" This rendition begins with Don talking about his process of writing the song...



If you want to more about starting a relationship with Jesus Christ visit www.WestchesterChapel.org/Salvation.

Friday, April 14, 2017

Good Friday: Abandonment to the Cross

Linda with Joyce and I just
before the turn of the century.
Tonight Dr. Linda Warren taught on Matthew 27 and Psalm 22:1-11, and as an analogy she shared how she came to the Lord. I was sobbing and sobbing, because she's the one who led Joyce to the Lord when they worked together at Sports Illustrated.

The opening is by Pastor Jim Warren. Readings from Matthew 27 by Pastor Linda, Elizabeth J., myself, and John C.



Click the arrow below, or if you're reading this in an email you can click this link, to play the service:

This service is available for download free on iTunes, where you can also subscribe to our podcast. Search for "Westchester Chapel" on the iTunes Store.

If you want to more about starting a relationship with Jesus Christ visit www.WestchesterChapel.org/Salvation.

Thursday, April 13, 2017

Maundy Thursday Fellowship

At our service tonight I read excerpts from Psalm 78.

Pastor Rachel Taylor leads us in remembering the Lord's Last Supper with his disciples. Kimberly A. reads Luke 22:7-13. Tamara W. Reads Luke 22:14-20.

Click the arrow below, or if you're reading this in an email you can click this link, to play the service:



This service is available for download free on iTunes, where you can also subscribe to our podcast. Search for "Westchester Chapel" on the iTunes Store.

If you want to more about starting a relationship with Jesus Christ visit www.WestchesterChapel.org/Salvation.

Photo courtesy of NicolettiPhoto.com.

Sunday, April 09, 2017

Written on a Palm Branch

In this morning's service at Westchester Chapel Dr. Linda Warren shares a story about how she wrote Joyce's name on a palm branch on a Palm Sunday about 25 years ago. It brought me to tears! Pastor Jim Warren preaches on John 12:12-19, with readings from John 11:23-27, 12:1-11, Zechariah 9:9, 12, and Matthew 11:28-30. He mentions The Case for Christ, which is in theaters now. Read my review here. Opening and commissioning of our new evangelism program, Mission Accomplish by Dr. Linda. Joyce prays over the leaders of our new evangelism program, Mission Accomplish.

Click the arrow below, or if you're reading this in an email you can click this link, to play the service:



This service is available for download free on iTunes, where you can also subscribe to our podcast. Search for "Westchester Chapel" on the iTunes Store.

Here's the trailer for The Case for Christ, preceded by an introduction by Lee Strobel and followed by an interview with him.



If you want to more about starting a relationship with Jesus Christ visit www.WestchesterChapel.org/Salvation.


Saturday, April 08, 2017

The Case for Christ

At the
AMC Empire on Times Square.
This is my new favorite movie, and that's only changed twice since 1981: Chariots of Fire and Risen are the only ones to have held that place in my heart since junior high.

The Case for Christ tells the true story of how Lee Strobel, a hard-boiled, award-winning investigative journalist for the Chicago Tribune set his skills on debunking the resurrection of Jesus Christ to convince his wife to abandon her newfound love for the Lord.

Acting, writing (Brian Bird: Captive, Touched by an Angel), cinematography (Brian Shanley: God's Not Dead, Do You Believe?) are all top shelf. Nothing cheesy about this one, and major papers are agreeing with that.

The worst The Hollywood Reporter could do was imply that the film stereotyped Lee Strobel as an atheist by showing him 'constantly acting like a jerk, including drinking heavily, accidentally terrifying his little girl, and whining to Leslie (his wife), "You’re cheating on me with Jesus!"' Maybe the reviewer missed the fact that this is a biography based on Lee's life.

My wife, Joyce, who was going to journalism school in Chicago when Lee Strobel was writing at the Chicago Tribune, said it was more accurate to say that those actions stereotyped Chicago journalists of the time. She said you had to be tough to make it.

The reviewer goes on to say that Leslie, 'on the other hand, displays infinite love and patience with her husband, proving that — as was also shown in the faith-based film War Room — Jesus makes an ideal marriage counselor.' I know the validity of Erika Christensen's portrayal of Leslie, because part of my own bride Joyce's testimony is that one of her co-workers said, about a year after Joyce gave her life to the Lord, that Joyce's changed life was the first miracle the woman had ever seen.

Also, the reviewer is leaving out the fact that both lead actors are much more nuanced than his review implies. Lee is very caring and loving at times, and it's clear that his investigation into the resurrection of Jesus Christ is an attempt to save what he perceives to be a crumbling marriage. He is deeply moved when he discovers something he didn't know about his father, played by Robert Forster. On the other side, Leslie certainly expresses the pain Lee is causing her through his attacks on Christianity, she raises her voice in numerous scenes, and at one point kicks Lee out for the night.

Forster's single scene was like an espresso: short but with a lot of punch. Another gem of a cameo was Faye Dunaway, playing another skeptic, but one who reluctantly directs him toward Truth.

One of the charming elements of the film is the detailing of the 80s: He drives a Trans Am with his massive mop flopping over his wide collars. He and his wife have worked out code for his pager. A fast call back to the editor is from a creatively marked pay phone. He pops open a flip top soda can. (I whispered to Joyce: "Hope that didn't take too many takes!") And my favorite: "How many licks does it take to get to the center of a Tootsie-Pop? The world may never know."

At the end of the day that's how Lee Strobel's atheist friend, aptly played by Brett Rice, puts it to him. We'll never know everything. It takes faith to believe or not to believe. If you're leaning toward disbelief I challenge you to see this film without presuppositions. If you still have questions read the book of the same title upon which the film is based. I have more ideas about faith at www.RichDrama.com/MyPassion.

I believe The Case for Christ is pure Truth in its best package yet.

We watched it in a packed house on Times Square, where it received robust applause. The showing after ours was sold out.

Find out if it's playing near you.

It's rated PG for images of the crucifixion, some smoking, drinking and a hospital scene of an injured gang member. At one point a character whispers, "Oh, G_d," and it's unclear whether it's a prayer.



I play a lead in Providence, which you can bring to your area.

Sunday, April 02, 2017

Fellowship and Servanthood

Elizabeth J. in the Moses Seat at in the
ruins of Chorazin, Israel, flanked by 
Rebekah W. and Anna S. 
in 2005.
I opened this service at Westchester Chapel mentioning The Hill family, who produced A Matter of Perspective, in which I performed last summer. Pastor Randy Solomon preaches on Matthew 23:1-12. He mentions the film Sing Over Me and shares an illustration from The Insanity of God. Joyce shares about films currently in theaters: Facing Darkness and The Case for Christ (trailer below).

Click the arrow below, or if you're reading this in an email you can click this link, to play the service:



This service is available for download free on iTunes, where you can also subscribe to our podcast. Search for "Westchester Chapel" on the iTunes Store.

If you want to more about starting a relationship with Jesus Christ visit www.WestchesterChapel.org/Salvation.




Tuesday, March 28, 2017

Pilgrim's Progress

We saw a fantastic production of Pilgrim's Progress last week put on by The Glory Shop. I was proud of Alexis Duperree and Nealson Munn, who were my students at the Salvation Army Conservatory where I teach and direct most summers. Of course Nealson was playing guitar, so I had nothing to do with that, but I was still proud!

The story is a powerful look at how every path but Jesus leads to death, and even once you choose Him there are trials at every turn.

The script is written by my colleague, Tom Key. He stuck with the 17th century language, but he added a brilliant modem interlude, performed by Alexis.

It was creatively staged by Christopher Monroe, and had possibly the most inventive use of black boxes and PVC pipe I've ever seen! He also got Tom's permission to cast Pilgrim as a woman, well played by Juilliard graduate Kristine Chandler. It heightened the power of the character's choice to leave an unbelieving family behind, fulfilling Luke 14:26: 'Jesus said to them, "If anyone comes to me and does not hate his own father and mother and wife and children and brothers and sisters, yes, and even his own life, he cannot be my disciple."' It also, in essence, combined the story with the second part in which Pilgrim's wife, Christiana, and their sons make the journey.

Another favorite element for me was the casting of the three angels. Each of their lines was spoken together in English, and then repeated in the actor's native tongue: Spanish, Mandarin, Portuguese. It was a foretaste of Heaven!

I have a very soft spot in my heart for this story, because it was one of the first I helped tell on a New York stage. In the early '90's I was an intern at The Lamb's Church, which had two Off-Broadway theatres. Twins Kurt and Keith Landaas were considering a production of their rock opera Pilgrim's Progress, and I happened to be the one showing them around the theatre. I mentioned to them that I'd love to audition, so they said, "Go for it." So I sang "Do You Hear the People Sing" from Les Misérables a'cappella right there in the balcony. It parlayed into my Off-Broadway debut, and we also performed it in New Jersey and Staten Island. It was a modern adaptation, and I played one of the darker characters. I found out later I was really intimidating some of the cast with faux piercings and borrowed motorcycle boots. LOL!

Watching Tom's script proved to me that Bunyan's allegory doesn't need a modern twist to make it relevant. It addresses many of the same issues we're still dealing with today.

--



A Clear Leading tells the story of Quaker abolitionist John Woolman, who spoke against slavery a century before our Civil War.

Sunday, March 26, 2017

Fellowship and Wonders

Joyce and I teamed up this morning at Westchester Chapel.

I open the service with miracle stories from the road, including the story of how the best man at our wedding found healing, as told in his book Waiting for My Fingers. Joyce teaches on Matthew 21:18-22. Here's the full article she mentions from the New York Times: "The Jihadi Who Turned to Jesus." Dr. Linda Warren prays over the sermon and announces that Facing Darkness, a documentary on a Samaritan's Purse doctor who contracted ebola while working with victims of the deadly disease in Africa, will be in theaters nationwide on March 30 and April 10. It will also be playing in New Rochelle. See the trailer below.

Click the arrow below, or if you're reading this in an email you can click this link, to play the service:



This service is available for download free on iTunes, where you can also subscribe to our podcast. Search for "Westchester Chapel" on the iTunes Store.



If you want to more about starting a relationship with Jesus Christ visit www.WestchesterChapel.org/Salvation.

Photo courtesy of NicolettiPhoto.com.

Saturday, March 18, 2017

Mission Underground

I got to serve as a consultant on this charming film in which children play adults. It's by the makers of A Matter of Perspective, and they've done a fantastic job!

It's available at www.ChristianCinema.com.

Wednesday, March 08, 2017

Southern Oregon

Though I've lived in New York City since 1993 I grew up in the Rogue Valley, so I try to get back here as often as I can. Often I perform or screen a film I helped make when I'm here. Hope you'll sign up and that we can connect soon!

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Sunday, February 19, 2017

Asking Jesus about Forgiveness

Joyce teaches on Matthew 18:21-35. Dr. Linda Warren opens the service in prayer.

Click the arrow below, or if you're reading this in an email you can click this link, to play the service:



Here's the imagery Joyce used toward the end of the sermon...



This service is available for download free on iTunes, where you can also subscribe to our podcast. Search for "Westchester Chapel" on the iTunes Store.

If you want to more about starting a relationship with Jesus Christ visit www.WestchesterChapel.org/Salvation.

Photo courtesy of NicolettiPhoto.com.


See the rest of Olympic champion Eric Liddell's Chariots of Fire story by booking Beyond the Chariots.

Saturday, February 18, 2017

Living Word


My 50th state was North Dakota.

I could have checked it off the list years ago! I was performing in Moorhead, MN, and I drove past the bridge into Fargo. I passed it by thinking I'd already been to ND. I got back to NYC and looked at a map on my wall: South Dakota! It was South Dakota! But I got to work with some wonderful folks, saw miracle after miracle, and it probably wouldn't have happened if I'd crossed that bridge all those years ago!

---


A Clear Leading tells the story of Quaker abolitionist John Woolman, who spoke against slavery a century before our Civil War.

Monday, February 13, 2017

The Case for Christ documentary

We just watched the documentary The Case for Christ with interviews with Lee Strobel and scholars who helped him gather evidence that Jesus Christ lived, was crucified, resurrected and changed the world.

Lee was an award-winning legal journalist for the Chicago Tribune. When his wife became a Christian he used his skills as an investigative journalist to disprove Christianity. After a two year journey he sat down with a legal pad and wrote down evidence for and against in separate columns. He said when he looked at the avalanche of evidence that the major claims of Christianity were true he realized it would take more faith to believe it didn't happen.

Looking forward to the major motion picture coming out in April.




Registration is now open for the 2017 Rocky Mountain Christian Filmmakers Camp.

Sunday, February 12, 2017

Snow Day

We canceled today's service at Westchester Chapel due to inclement weather, so we're catching up by posting sermons that were recorded but not posted. Click the sermon title below to go to the sermon, which has been posted on this blog in the order of the date preached:
Do What Jesus Did, March 8, 2009: Pastor Joyce Swingle teaches on Acts 5:12-15.
Holiness Unto the Lord, July 17, 2016: Rich Swingle teaches on Exodus 28:36-38.
Breaking Paradigms, October 9, 2016: Pastor Joyce Swingle teaches on Matthew 16:13-20.
Forgiveness and Fellowship: Peacemaker or a Peace Faker? February 5, 1017: Pastor Pastor Joyce Swingle teaches on Matthew 18:15-20.
Here's a song I was going to introduce today, but Dr. Linda Warren will lead it next Sunday. You can get a head start learning it:



If you want to more about starting a relationship with Jesus Christ visit www.WestchesterChapel.org/Salvation.


Registration is now open for the 2017 Rocky Mountain Christian Filmmakers Camp.

Thursday, February 09, 2017

They Called Him Coach

I just had a delightful surprise watching this documentary on John Wooden, who holds all kinds of records as a basketball coach for UCLA. The one that impressed me the most is that he holds the all-time 40 season winning percentage of .813 (Dayton High School, South Bend Central High School, Indiana State Teachers College, UCLA). That's a whole lotta winning! Along the way came a record ten national championships, seven of those were consecutive (another record), and an 88 game winning streak over three years, and the records go on! What!? Unbelievable!

They Called Him Coach spends some time on his success, but most of the focus is on the foundation of his success and how it was all built upon his relationship with the Lord Jesus Christ.

Every year he started the season handing out his Pyramid of Success, but he never talked about winning! His Pyramid is a number of foundational, biblical principles established through faith and patience to have a successful game... and (always his real point) a successful life.

One of the producers of this film is David McCasland, who produced a documentary on Eric Liddell, also for Day of Discovery. David wrote what I believe is still the authoritative biography on the world-record breaking Olympian-turned-missionary. I got to have dinner with David and his wife Luann after a performance of my play on Liddell.




Registration is now open for the 2017 Rocky Mountain Christian Filmmakers Camp.

Wednesday, February 08, 2017

Our Last Stand

ISIS destroyed this church in Syria.
A few years ago,  Jordan Allott was interviewed on FOX NEWS during the same program as Father Gabriel Adde, a Syrian Orthodox priest. After the program Jordan met with the Adde family and soon struck up a conversation with Fr. Adde's daughter Helma. After college Helma, born in Chicago, had lived six months in her family's hometown of Quarmishli in Northern Syria. Jordan was telling Helma about plans to return to that part of the world to film a documentary about the persecution of Christians there, and that Quarmishli was on his itinerary. Helma felt a tinge of jealousy that an American with no ties to the Middle East would be visiting a place she loved so much, but before long Allott asked her if she would like to join him for the journey. He had been looking for someone who knew the cultures of both places to be a bridge for Western viewers.

Last night I saw the documentary of their trip, Our Last Stand, at the Sheen Center for Thought and Culture. They begin their journey in Iraq visiting Christian refugee centers, then they cross the Tigris River into Syria and visit the front lines where Christians are defending themselves against ISIS. When ISIS moves into an area, they identify Christians and other religious minorities and give them 24 hours to either move away, become Muslim, be executed or pay a very high fine.

During the Q and A session following the screening, the Sheen Center's David DiCerto asked Jordan and Helma what they think of the temporary closure of our borders to refugees from Iraq, Syria and other nations that cultivate terrorism. Jordan referenced an interview in the film with a little boy in Iraq. You can see part of it in the trailer below. The boy says that ISIS left them with nothing, and he said he and his people just want to live, and he hopes a country will take them in. Jordan said he would love for all those who have been displaced by what has recently been recognized by the U.N. as the ISIS genocide to have a home in the U.S. He went on to say that it saddens him that this situation is being used as a political statement against the current administration. He asked where the outrage was when President Obama used an executive order to halt the "Wet Foot/Dry Foot" policy with Cuba, leaving many who were in transit deported back to Cuba. He spoke about how Christians and other religious minorities do not feel comfortable staying in UN-sanctioned refugee villages because they know they'll face persecution from Muslims there. He asked where the outrage was when the UN refused to share resources with Christians who created their own refugee camps in churches.

David asked Jordan why he named the film Our Last Stand. Jordan and Helma both made it clear that this is a tragedy for all Christians, and that in a matter of years there truly may not be any churches or Christians left in that part of the world where followers of Jesus Christ were first called Christians.

I was interviewed after the event by NET TV for a program featuring the film and screening which will air tonight at 7:30pm Eastern. NET TV is also streamed online.





Registration is now open for the 2017 Rocky Mountain Christian Filmmakers Camp.

Monday, February 06, 2017

Colonel Papa Cubano

Joyce and I just finished our first short film! It's about a family we met in Cuba. It's the true story of an atheist who becomes head of the Salvation Army in Cuba and one of the stories that helped him get there.

It stars Marco Santiago (America's Next Top Model), Patricia Mauceri (Courageous Love, The Farmer and the Belle, One Life to Live) and I narrate it.

We'll let you know when it's released via RichDrama.com/Updates.

Thursday, February 02, 2017

The King's Messengers

I performed in two of the four parts to this mini-series set in the fictional nation of Zanora. Once again, Daniel Knudsen has brought truth to the screen in a delightful way. This is my sixth collaboration with Daniel, and it's always a joy!

It was selected for the 2017 Christian Worldview Film Festival, and is available online.



Registration is now open for the 2017 Rocky Mountain Christian Filmmakers Camp.

Wednesday, February 01, 2017

Recommended Reading for Spiritual Formation

Here are some books that have helped me grow in my walk with the Lord over the years:

• The Bible. I read it cover to cover every year: www.RichDrama.com/BibleReading
• A Discipleship Journey by David Buehring
• Ordering Your Private World by Gordon MacDonald. For a season I read chapter three, "Caught in a Golden Cage" at the start of every year. It explains the differences between being called and being driven.
• Knowing God by J.I. Packer
• The Hiding Place by Corrie ten Boom. I've been blessed to know both women who played Corrie in the movies based on this book.
• The Cross and the Switchblade by David Wilkerson
• God's Smuggler by Brother Andrew
• The Intercessor by Reese Howells
• No Compromise: The Life Story of Keith Green by Melody Green
• Evangelism Explosion by Dr. James Kennedy

Registration is now open for the 2017 Rocky Mountain Christian Filmmakers Camp.